Michael Cohen wants a state judge to order the Trump Organization to turn over documents that he claims would prove the company promised to pay his legal bills, according to a New York state court filing on Wednesday, Fortune reported.

What’s the story?

Cohen, who filed a nearly $4 million lawsuit against the Trump Organization in March, alleged that internal memos and other communications would show the company’s previous commitment to cover legal fees associated with congressional investigations, special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, and his prosecution in Manhattan.

The company stopped paying his legal bills when he started cooperating with prosecutors, according to Cohen.

The 53-year-old former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump pleaded guilty to lying to Congress, bank fraud, and violating campaign finance laws.

He began serving his three-year prison sentence at the medium-security Federal Correction Facility in Otisville, in the Catskills Mountains, on Monday, according to the New York Post.

Last month, the Trump Organization asked the court to toss the case, citing Cohen’s desire to score a “payday.”

Cohen’s lawyers asked the judge to deny the company’s request and grant him the documents that Cohen believes would support his claims.

“Mr. Cohen has alleged that he incurred unconscionable injury — in the form of both significant monetary harm as well as irreversible prejudice to his legal interests and reputation — as a result of the organization’s failure to indemnify him and reimburse his legal expenses,” Cohen’s lawyers said, according to Fortune.

Trump and his team say there isn’t any merit in the accusations made by a lying felon.

What else?

Cohen, the president’s former “fixer,” waged war against him over the idea that he took the fall for his former boss over alleged hush money paid to porn star Stormy Daniels — real name is Stephanie Clifford — who claimed she had sex with Trump in 2006.

He once claimed he would “take a bullet” for the president but now he describes him as a “con man.”

The now-disbarred lawyer has denied that the money would enable his family to maintain their lavish lifestyle.

The couple’s taxi medallions, which provided much of their wealth, have declined with the rise of ride-share companies, according to Fortune. They recently put up their Park Avenue home as collateral for their devalued taxi medallions.

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