Upset that Georgia’s protection of the unborn stirred their guilty consciences, the Tinseltown bullies are now beginning to make good on their promises to boycott the state for signing into a law a fetal heartbeat bill that would ban abortions once a baby’s heartbeat is detected in its mother’s womb.

According to The Hollywood Reporter (THR), as many as four production companies have announced they will be boycotting the state of Georgia by preventing any projects from being filmed there. Due to the state’s massive tax break on film productions, Georgia has earned the nickname, “the Hollywood of the South,” and has served as filming home to such major motion pictures as “Black Panther” and popular TV shows like “Stranger Things.”

Christine Vachon, CEO of Killer Films, which produced films like “Vox Lux” and “First Reformed,” announced on Thursday morning that the company will “no longer consider Georgia as a viable shooting location until this ridiculous law is overturned.”

David Simon, who runs Blown Deadline Productions, and who created “The Wire” and “The Deuce,” said that he could not in good conscience ask any female under his employment to shoot in Georgia.

“I can’t ask any female member of any film production with which I am involved to so marginalize themselves or compromise their inalienable authority over their own bodies. I must undertake production where the rights of all citizens remain intact,” David Simon said in a tweet.

“Can only speak for my production company. Our comparative assessments of locations for upcoming development will pull Georgia off the list until we can be assured the health options and civil liberties of our female colleagues are unimpaired,” he continued.

David Simon is the same individual who encouraged people to “pick up a g***amn brick” if President Trump ever halted the Mueller investigation.

Simultaneously, Mark Duplass of Duplass Brothers Productions urged other companies on Thursday to blackball Georgia.

“Don’t give your business to Georgia,” he wrote. “Will you pledge with me not to film anything in Georgia until they reverse this backwards legislation?”

Later, CounterNarrative films, which produced the Netflix movie “Triple Frontier,” said that it will no longer shoot in Georgia. “No Georgia filming on any of our projects until this law is gone,” wrote producer Neal Dodson on Twitter.

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) said that will be watching the Georgia law closely as it faces challenges in court.

“Film and television production in Georgia supports more than 92,000 jobs and brings significant economic benefits to communities and families,” senior VP communications Chris Ortman told THR. “It is important to remember that similar legislation has been attempted in other states, and has either been enjoined by the courts or is currently being challenged. The outcome in Georgia will also be determined through the legal process. We will continue to monitor developments.”

Prior to the law passing, the Hollywood Writers Guild also threatened to boycott the state. The Guild was later joined by a petition from several actors who vowed they would not work in the state anymore.

“This law would make Georgia an inhospitable place for those in the film and television industry to work, including our members,” the Guild’s statement read. “If the Georgia Legislature and Governor Kemp make HB 481 law, it is entirely possible that many of those in our industry will either want to leave the state or decide not to bring productions there. Such is the potential cost of a blatant attack on every woman’s right to control her own body.”

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