Republican lawmakers are feeling rattled after a long week capped by a raucous presidential rally where thousands chanted “send her back” at Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarAmash responds to ‘Send her back’ chants at Trump rally: ‘This is how history’s worst episodes begin’ McConnell: Trump ‘on to something’ with attacks on Dem congresswomen Sally Yates: Moral fiber of US being ‘shredded by unapologetic racism’ MORE (D-Minn.), a Somali refugee who became a U.S. citizen and one of the first Muslim women to serve in Congress.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to ‘Send her back’ chants at Trump rally: ‘This is how history’s worst episodes begin’ McConnell: Trump ‘on to something’ with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts ‘corrupt’ Puerto Rico’s leaders amid political crisis MORE distanced himself from the chant on Thursday, saying it made him unhappy and that he disagreed with it.

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But he also did not seek to tamp down the chant when it happened on Wednesday night, and the crowd was clearly responding to Trump’s attacks on Omar and three other minority congresswomen he earlier in the week had said should go back to their home counties.

Three of the women were born in the United States, and while Republicans have blasted their progressive politics, many were uncomfortable at best with Trump’s choice of words.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump’s no racist — he’s an equal opportunity offender Lawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei GOP put on the back foot by Trump’s race storm MORE (R-Utah), the Republican presidential nominee in 2012 and now an elder statesman of the Senate, warned Thursday that the chants in North Carolina were “offensive” and would likely hurt his party’s image.

“I found the chanting and the chants to be offensive. Very unfortunate for my party but also for our country,” Romney lamented to reporters.

Only a day before, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Trump ‘on to something’ with attacks on Dem congresswomen Dems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Senate passes bill making hacking voting systems a federal crime MORE (R-Ky.) had tried to defuse the uproar over Trump’s tweets over the weekend saying the four Democratic lawmakers should “go back” to where they came from.

“Lower all this incendiary rhetoric. Everyone should do it,” he said.

Other senators complained Trump’s controversial attacks and the media frenzy they caused has distracted from their efforts to highlight the strong economy and other issues.

There was a feeling of exhaustion in the Senate Republican conference after much of Monday and Tuesday was spent responding to media questions about Trump’s tweets.

Just when they thought the storm had passed, it flared up again Thursday because of the rally.

Republican senators found themselves wearily repeating the statements they had issued earlier in the week.

“I would like to see, as I’ve said before, the tone of the rhetoric in the country used by all just raise a level and create for a little bit more civilized discourse,” said Senate Republican Whip John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneTrump angry more Republicans haven’t defended his tweets: report White House abruptly cancels Trump meeting with GOP leaders McConnell says Trump is not a racist, but calls for better rhetoric MORE (R-S.D.), who added that he didn’t watch any of the rally.

Others said they were sick of having to constantly respond to Trump’s behavior.

“I don’t want to regurgitate all the things that have been said. I try not to get too distracted by this or I won’t get anything else done,” said a senior Republican senator. “I don’t know why we feel we’ve got to wallow in it. We’ve got other bigger fish to fry.”

A Senate Republican aide who requested anonymity to describe the sense of fatigue among Republicans said, “Many Republican strategists feel like quitting because they’re tired of waking up every day and twisting themselves into pretzels to rationalize what the president says.”

For many Republican lawmakers, the image of Trump bashing Omar as a boisterous crowd of supporters chanted “send her back” was jarring.  

National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Tom EmmerThomas (Tom) Earl EmmerGOP House campaign chair condemns ‘send her back’ chants The Hill’s Morning Report – Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP House asks Facebook: ‘What is Libra?’ MORE (R-Minn.) told reporters at a breakfast that “there’s no place for that kind of talk,” adding “I don’t agree with it.”

House Republican Vice Chairman Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark Walker GOP lawmaker decries ‘send her back’ chants: ‘This ugliness must end’ GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries This week: Lawmakers return as Amash fallout looms MORE (R-N.C.) said “it’s not the right way for Americans to talk to other Americans, period.”

“I’m offended by ‘send her back’ or ‘send them back’ — they are American citizens,” he told reporters after attending the Trump rally in North Carolina.

“I can’t sit here as a former pastor who’s worked in refugee camps, who cherishes the wonderful minority communities there are that have supported us and continue to support us without saying, ‘That’s offensive,’” he said.

A group of House Republican leaders told Vice President Pence at a breakfast meeting Thursday they were disturbed by the “send her back” chants and urged him to ask Trump to rein in his rhetoric.  

Even one of Trump’s staunchest allies, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate passes bill making hacking voting systems a federal crime Graham: Trump’s attacks on minority congresswomen more ‘narcissism’ than racism Meghan McCain promotes July 17 as #GBMday to raise awareness of father’s cancer MORE (R-S.C.), urged the president to drop personal attacks on Omar and the other three congresswomen, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezTop Missouri newspaper condemns GOP’s ‘shameful silence’ on Trump’s ‘racism’ Restaurant in city where Trump rally held donating profits to immigrants Crowd chanting ‘welcome home Ilhan’ greets Omar at airport MORE (N.Y.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibAmash responds to ‘Send her back’ chants at Trump rally: ‘This is how history’s worst episodes begin’ McConnell: Trump ‘on to something’ with attacks on Dem congresswomen Sally Yates: Moral fiber of US being ‘shredded by unapologetic racism’ MORE (Mich.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyAmash responds to ‘Send her back’ chants at Trump rally: ‘This is how history’s worst episodes begin’ McConnell: Trump ‘on to something’ with attacks on Dem congresswomen Sally Yates: Moral fiber of US being ‘shredded by unapologetic racism’ MORE (Mass.).

“All of these congressmen won their election. They’re American citizens. This is their home as much as mine,” Graham told reporters. “I think everybody should tamp it down.”

The outcry from fellow Republicans prompted Trump to take a step back.

After appearing to relish the enthusiastic response from the crowd Wednesday night, Trump told reporters mid Thursday that he didn’t approve of the “send her back” chants.

“I was not happy with it. I disagree with it,” Trump said.

Asked why he did not stop the chants, the president insisted, “I think I did. I started speaking very quickly.”

But then Trump later defended supporters who chanted “send her back” as being motivated by patriotism.

“These are people that love our country. I want them to keep loving our country. And I think the congresswomen, by the way, should be more positive than they are,” he said, referring to Omar, Ocasio-Cortez, Tlaib and Pressley.

The mixed messages from Trump are likely to raise questions for Republicans about what will happen if the chants start again at Trump’s next fally.

The president in his comments later on Thursday afternoon reiterated that he was not happy with the chant but said the Democratic lawmakers “have a big obligation and the obligation is to love your country.”

Juliegrace Brufke and Jordain Carney contributed.

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