https://newsthud.com/delusional-ap-bosses-force-journos-to-abandon-the-word-crisis-because-biden-and-psaki-dont-like-it/

“Having been at the border today, I can tell you anyone denying that there is a crisis is delusional,” said Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, reacting to the revelation that the Associated Press won’t let their reporters and contributors say the word “crisis” about the border.

Literally the only reason is because Jen Psaki and Joe Biden don’t like it. The administration said they won’t call it a crisis, they refuse to budge, and the Associated Press just rolls over and complies.

“Associated Press Vice President and Editor-at-Large for Standards John Daniszewski advised reporters this week to avoid using the word “crisis” in their immigration coverage,” write Becket Adams at the Washington Examiner, “putting the global news wire on the same page as the Biden administration, which likewise asserts there’s no crisis at the border.”

“The current event in the news — a sharp increase in the arrival of unaccompanied minors — is a problem for border officials, a political challenge for Biden and a dire situation for many migrants who make the journey, but it does not fit the classic dictionary definition of a crisis,” the memo ridiculously claims.

Fox News posted the internal memo, shared in a tweet, which came in a memo titled “From the Standards Center: A note about the current increase in border entrances.”

The memo sets it up with a LOT of padding, because they know it’s a scam.

With immigration and border back in the news, it is especially imperative for the AP to consistently use accurate and neutral language in its coverage along with giving proper context to border numbers given the political rhetoric on the topic.

there has been a rise in unaccompanied minors cross the southwestern U.S. border in the last two months since the start of the Biden administration. This follows a monthly increase in border crossings each month since April, or the last eight months of the Trump presidency. The current level of crossings in 2021 is roughly equal to the last upturn that occurred in mid-2019.

Migration has waxed and waned in recent years. The variability is tied to changes in economic and political conditions in the countries of origin and in the United States, as people decide whether the opportunities and risk justify making the attempt to try to cross into the United States. Some believe that the current increase is a product of regular season fluctuation.

Who are you trying to convince? Then they get to the meat.

Here are some tips to language to use and not use:

“Crisis” The current event in the news — a sharp increase in the arrival of unaccompanied minors — is a problem for border officials, a political challenge for Biden and a dire situation for many migrants who make the journey, but it does not fit the classic dictionary definition of a crisis, which is: “A turning point in the course of anything; decisive or crucial times, state, or event,” OR “a time of, or a state of affairs involving, great danger or trouble, often one which threatens to result in unpleasant consequences [an economic crisis] — SYN. Emergency.” Therefore, we should avoid, or at the least, be highly cautious, about referring to the present situation as a crisis on our own, although we may quote others using that language.

If using the word “crisis,” we need to ask of what and to whom. There could be a humanitarian crisis if the numbers grow so large that officials cannot house the migrants safely or in sanitary conditions. Migrants may face humanitarian crises in their home countries. In theory, there could be a security or a border crisis if officials lose control of the border, allowing people to enter unencumbered in large numbers. But, in general, avoid hyperbole in calling anything a crisis or an emergency.

“The current events in the news – a sharp increase in the arrival of unaccompanied minors – is a problem for border officials, a political challenge for Biden and a dire situation for many migrants who make the journey, but it does not fit the classic dictionary definition of a crisis,” the memo reads.

“Therefore,” it adds, “we should avoid, or at least, be highly cautious, about referring to the present situation as a crisis on our own, although we may quote others using that language. If using the word ‘crisis,’ we need to ask of what and to whom.”

Becket Adams points out at least one missing piece of “context”:

It is strange that the Associated Press has not yet deployed the term “humanitarian crisis” to describe the current situation at the border. It’s strange given the Associated Press used this term specifically during the Trump administration, even when undocumented immigrants came in smaller surges.

Go figure.

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