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Derek Chauvin, 45, is pictured in his prison jumpsuit on his first night in Oak Park Heights maximum security prison where he’s placed on suicide watch ahead of sentencing in eight weeks

  • The Minnesota Department of Corrections released the new booking photo on Wednesday morning as Derek Chauvin woke up from his first night at MCF-Oak Park Heights 
  • He is being closely watched by guards to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates with violent criminal histories, many of whom resent law enforcement 
  • Cheers erupted outside courthouse on Tuesday as Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd 
  • Chauvin faces a minimum sentence of 12.5 years and maximum of 40 years for second-degree murder 
  • The former cop is expected to file a swift appeal of his conviction 
  • Celebrations took place across US as President Biden pledged to push through civil rights reforms after calling the killing of George Floyd a ‘stain on nation’s soul’   
  • Biden’s Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department’s policing practices 

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Derek Chauvin has been pictured in his first mugshot taken at the maximum security prison in Minnesota where he’s on suicide watch after being found guilty on all three counts of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd.  

The Minnesota Department of Corrections released the new booking photo on Wednesday morning as Chauvin woke up from his first night at MCF-Oak Park Heights.

The 45-year-old dressed in an orange jumpsuit appeared tired and puffy-eyed with a frown and his hair in disarray. 

It took the jury just over ten hours of deliberation to find Chauvin guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter on Tuesday based on a mountain of evidence and testimony presented over 15 days of trial in the Hennepin County court. 

Chauvin faces a minimum sentence of 12.5 years and maximum of 40 years for second-degree murder. He will only be sentenced on that charge because all three stemmed from the same crime. Prosecutors have not been clear about how long they will ask the judge to put Chauvin away for but they have said they will ask him to consider aggravating factors and go beyond the sentencing guidelines. 

The former cop is expected to file a swift appeal of his conviction. Over the course of the trial his defense attorney Eric Nelson repeatedly raised concerns that the massive media attention to the case would bias the jury and prevent his client from receiving a fair trial. Other issues that could be brought up on appeal are Rep Maxine Waters’ incendiary comments on the eve of closing statements, protests over the death of Daunte Wright and the city’s announcement of a $27million settlement with Floyd’s family in the middle of jury selection. 

The Minnesota Department of Corrections released Derek Chauvin’s new booking photo on Wednesday morning as he woke up from his first night at MCF-Oak Park Heights

No prisoner has ever escaped from Oak Park Heights which houses around 500 of the most dangerous inmates in the state, 25 miles east of Minneapolis, on the border with Wisconsin. Chauvin is being closely watched by guards to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates with violent criminal histories, many of whom resent law enforcement.

No prisoner has ever escaped from Oak Park Heights which houses around 500 of the most dangerous inmates in the state, 25 miles east of Minneapolis, on the border with Wisconsin. Chauvin is being closely watched by guards to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates with violent criminal histories, many of whom resent law enforcement. 

Tuesday’s verdict triggered cheers outside the Minneapolis courthouse and massive celebrations across America while Joe Biden vowed to push through civil rights reforms after the killing he called a ‘stain on the nation’s soul.’

Within minutes Biden phoned Floyd’s family to tell them that his death, which had sparked a wave of global Black Lives Matter protests, was going to ‘change the world’.

The president was backed by other senior Democrats, including Barack Obama, who said: ‘We know that true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial.’

On Wednesday Biden’s Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department’s policing practices that will examine whether the force engages in systemic discrimination and how it handles allegations of misconduct.

Garland said Tuesday’s verdict in the Chauvin case ‘does not address potentially systemic policing issues in Minneapolis.’ The probe is a civil investigation ‘to determine whether the Minneapolis Police Department engages in a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing,’ he said.  

Chauvin looked around in seeming disbelief as the judge read the decision on Tuesday, which centered around footage of the nine minutes and 29 seconds that he had knelt on Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed, unarmed black man cried out: ‘I can’t breathe’ on May 25, 2020.  

Chauvin was led away in handcuffs as the judge immediately revoked his bail pending sentencing and dispatched him to Minnesota’s only maximum security prison, MCF-Oak Park Heights. 

No prisoner has ever escaped from MCF-Oak Park Heights, which sits about 25 miles east of Minneapolis near the Wisconsin border and houses around 500 of the most high-risk inmates in the state. 

Chauvin is being closely watched by guards to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates with violent criminal histories, many of whom resent law enforcement. 

As Chauvin was placed on suicide watch: 

  • Biden, Obama and other senior Democrats vowed to make Floyd’s death a turning point in civil rights
  • Biden phoned Floyd’s family outside the court to pledge that he was going to change the course of history 
  • People took to the streets across the country, from Minnesota to New York, as the historic verdict came in
  • Thousands of relieved National Guard in Minneapolis were able to stand down after weeks on tenterhooks  
  • Floyd’s family held a press conference, with his six-year-old daughter Gianna among the tearful gathering
  • ‘We are able to breathe again,’ younger brother Philonise said. ‘Justice for George means freedom for all’ 
  • Far-left Democrats, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar, claim that verdict ‘is not justice’ 
  • Biden’s Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department’s policing practices
Derek Chauvin is pictured in court on Tuesday as the jury found him guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd

Derek Chauvin is pictured in court on Tuesday as the jury found him guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd

Chauvin was led out of the court in handcuffs after the verdict came down on Tuesday afternoon

The number is said to have belonged to the former cop's lawyer, Eric Nelson, and was visible as he stood up from his seat

Chauvin was led out of the court in handcuffs after the verdict came down on Tuesday afternoon. He had reportedly scribbled his lawyer’s phone number on the palm of his hand (right) before he was escorted out

Chauvin is being closely watched by guards at MCF Oak Park Heights to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates

Chauvin is being closely watched by guards at MCF Oak Park Heights to ensure his safety, not just as a suicide risk, but also from other inmates 

The medical cell inside Oak Park Heights is pictured above. Chauvin is expected to be held at the prison until his sentencing

The medical cell inside Oak Park Heights is pictured above. Chauvin is expected to be held at the prison until his sentencing

Jim Bruton, former warden of Oak Park Heights, described in his 2004 book about the prison how the hierarchy among inmates was determined by the crime committed. At the top of the scale are those who have killed a law enforcement officer. At the bottom are sex offenders, with child molesters considered the lowest of the low.

This hierarchy, coupled with Chauvin’s infamy as a police officer, means he will undoubtedly require bolstered protection and constant monitoring.

Four grounds for Chauvin’s appeal

With Chauvin almost certain to appeal, the politically explosive case could be far from over. With nine out of every ten appeals refused by US courts, defense attorney Nelson will face an uphill task.

Chauvin’s legal team is expected to seize on four key issues as grounds for a re-trial – the first being the location of the trial. 

Too close to home 

While Floyd’s shocking death under Chauvin’s knee triggered months of protests across the globe, nowhere was the pain and anguish felt more acutely than in his native Minneapolis.

The ex-cop’s legal team had argued there was no way their client could get a fair trial in Hennepin County but Judge Cahill refused to move it to another city because he said the chaos and anger surrounding Chauvin would follow him wherever he went. 

Likewise, Cahill refused to delay proceedings given the unlikelihood that anyone could forget the names of those involved or harrowing video of Floyd’s last moments. 

Another shooting, fresh outrage 

The second issue centers around the police-shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old black man who was gunned down by a white cop on April 11 in a Minneapolis suburb just 10 miles from where Floyd was killed. 

As protests erupted over Wright’s death in the middle of Chauvin’s trial, Nelson filed a motion to sequester the jury to shield them from media coverage. 

Nelson argued that ‘the emotional response [Wright’s] case creates sets the stage for a jury to say: “I’m not going to vote not guilty, because I’m concerned about the outcome.”‘ 

Cahill decided ultimately that sequestering the jury could bring even more attention to the Brooklyn Center tragedy and denied the motion, as he had done with Nelson’s earlier previous bids for sequestration. 

Maxine Waters’ incitement 

Perhaps the most powerful argument for a re-trial was acknowledged by Cahill himself on Monday evening immediately after the jury was sent out to deliberate.  

It came when Nelson filed a motion for a mistrial and cited comments from Congresswoman Maxine Waters, who on the eve on closing statements attended a demonstration in Brooklyn Center and called for protesters to ‘get more confrontational’ if the Chauvin jury did not return a verdict of ‘guilty, guilty, guilty’. 

Chauvin denied the motion but said Waters may have handed the defense ‘something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned’. 

Floyd family payoff 

The fourth issue likely to be cited in the defense appeal took place before the trial even started, when the city of Minneapolis announced it would pay a $27million settlement to the Floyd family.  

Nelson immediately asked for the trial to be moved and postponed on the grounds that the untimely announcement would taint the jury, but his request fell on deaf ears.

Instead, it was agreed that the judge would re-voire dire the jurors already seated. Two jurors were dismissed after having admitted that they heard about the settlement and it left them unable to be impartial.

The timing of the announcement clearly enraged Judge Cahill, prompting an outburst from the bench in which he ordered both the state and defense, ‘Just stop talking about it!’

 

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Cheers rang out across America, from Minnesota to New York City, on Tuesday afternoon as thousands celebrated the verdict in the case which had sparked months of rioting and set in motion the global Black Lives Matter movement. 

President Biden phoned family members and lawyers for George Floyd just minutes after the verdict came in, consoling family members and celebrating a verdict that he said would ‘change the world.’

The call, and those from Vice President Kamala Harris and First Lady Jill Biden, was played on speaker phone by lead attorney Benjamin Crump as members of the family gathered around as the moment was broadcast live on cable news.

‘Feeling better now,’ Biden told tearful family members and listeners who gathered around the phone of Philonise Floyd, George’s younger brother, ‘Nothing is going to make it all better. But at least, God, now there’s some justice.’

Biden referenced comments by Floyd’s daughter, Gianna, that her late father was going to change the world.

‘He’s going to start to change it now,’ Biden told the group.

Biden previously revealed he also called the family Monday, with the outcome uncertain – and as the White House noted repeatedly, the jury was sequestered.

Minneapolis had been on tenterhooks waiting for the verdict to come in amid fears that if a guilty verdict had not been returned then riots would have ensued. The National Guard had been deployed and razor wire surrounded the courthouse. 

Biden said: ‘We’ve been watching every second of this, and the vice president, all of us. We were all so relieved, not just one verdict but all three.’ 

Harris, the nation’s first black and first female vice president, also spoke. ‘I’m just so grateful for the entire family,’ she said, saluting ‘your courage, your commitment.’

‘This is a day of justice in America,’ Harris said. She called the family ‘real leaders when we needed you.’

‘History will look back at this moment and know that it was an inflection moment,’ she said. ‘We’re going to make something good come out of this tragedy, okay?’ she said.

Then Biden chimed back in, ‘When we do it, we’re going to put you on Air Force One and get you here,’ prompting laughs.

Floyd’s younger brother Philonise, who had taken a knee at the courthouse steps at the start of the trial, was in court to hear the verdict read.

He hugged Attorney General Keith Ellison and trial attorney Jerry Blackwell, whose voice was the first and last heard by the jury as he delivered both the state’s opening statement and their final rebuttal. 

Moments later the family held a press conference outside the courtroom with their lawyer Crump, the Rev. Al Sharpton and the Rev. Jesse Jackson.

‘Today, we are able to breathe again,’ younger brother Philonise said. ‘Justice for George means freedom for all.’

Tears streamed down his face as he likened Floyd to the 1955 Mississippi lynching victim Emmett Till, except that this time there were cameras around to show the world what happened. 

Floyd’s six-year-old daughter Gianna was in attendance for the press conference as well, along with other members of the family. 

‘Say his name!’ Floyd’s relatives chanted as they gathered together. ‘George Floyd!’

Another brother, Terrence Floyd, said today was important not just for their family but for America’s history. 

 ‘I will miss him, but now I know he’s in history,’ Terrence said. ‘What a day to be a Floyd, man.’  

Those sentiments were echoed by former president Barack Obama and his wife Michelle who said that the jury had done ‘the right thing’ in finding Chauvin guilty.

In a joint statement, they said: ‘For almost a year, Floyd’s death under the knee of a police officer has reverberated around the world — inspiring murals and marches, sparking conversations in living rooms and new legislation.

‘But a more basic question has always remained: would justice be done?

‘In this case, at least, we have our answer. But if we’re being honest with ourselves, we know that true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial.’

The pair called for ‘concrete reforms’ in policing and for the elimination of racial bias from the nation’s criminal justice system.

‘Michelle and I send our prayers to the Floyd family, and we stand with all those who are committed to guaranteeing every American the full measure of justice that George and so many others have been denied,’ he said. 

British prime minister Boris Johnson also tweeted his response, writing: ‘I was appalled by the death of George Floyd and welcome this verdict. My thoughts tonight are with George Floyd’s family and friends.’ 

Later in a televised address, Biden said that the conviction ‘can be a giant step forward in the march towards justice in America.’

Vice president Harris said that ‘a measure of justice isn’t the same as equal justice.’ She added: ‘This verdict brings us a step closer and the fact is, we still have work to do. We still must reform the system.’  

Chauvin, 45, was accused of killing Floyd by pinning his knee on the 46-year-old black man's neck for nine minutes, 29 seconds, as he lay face-down in handcuffs after being detained for using an alleged counterfeit $20 bill to buy cigarettes

George Floyd

Chauvin, 45, was accused of killing Floyd by pinning his knee on the 46-year-old black man’s neck for 9 minutes, 29 seconds, as he lay face-down in handcuffs after being detained for using an alleged counterfeit $20 bill to buy cigarettes

Cheers rose from the crowds that had gathered outside the courthouse after the verdict was read

People cheer outside the Cup Foods where Floyd died after Chauvin was found guilty on Tuesday

People cheer outside the Cup Foods where Floyd died after Chauvin was found guilty on Tuesday

People celebrate Chauvin's guilty verdict, at the site where Floyd was killed in May, on Tuesday afternoon

People celebrate Chauvin’s guilty verdict, at the site where Floyd was killed in May, on Tuesday afternoon

Floydeorge 'Gs six-year-old daughter Gianna was in attendance for the Tuesday press conference, along with other members of the family following the verdict

George Floyd’s six-year-old daughter Gianna was in attendance for the Tuesday press conference, along with other members of the family 

President Joe Biden phoned family members and lawyers for George Floyd and lawyer Benjamin Crump on Tuesday following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin case

President Joe Biden phoned family members and lawyers for George Floyd and lawyer Benjamin Crump on Tuesday following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin case

Brandon Williams, nephew of George Floyd, stands flanked by Reverend Al Sharpton (2nd L) and Attorney Ben Crump (R) during the press conference

Brandon Williams, nephew of George Floyd, stands flanked by Reverend Al Sharpton (2nd L) and Attorney Ben Crump (R) during the press conference

'Today, we are able to breathe again,' one of Floyd's younger brothers, Philonise, said at the conference, just moments after the verdict was read. 'Justice for George means freedom for all'

Tears streamed down his face as he likened Floyd to the 1955 Mississippi lynching victim Emmett Till, except that this time there were cameras around to show the world what happened

‘Today, we are able to breathe again,’ one of Floyd’s younger brothers, Philonise, said at the conference, just moments after the verdict was read. ‘Justice for George means freedom for all’

Philonise is flanked by Rev Al Sharpton and attorney Ben Crump as he offers words

Philonise is flanked by Rev Al Sharpton and attorney Ben Crump as he offers words

'I will miss him, but now I know he's in history,' Terrence Floyd said. 'What a day to be a Floyd, man'

‘I will miss him, but now I know he’s in history,’ Terrence Floyd said. ‘What a day to be a Floyd, man’

Reverend Al Sharpton cries following the verdict in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis

Reverend Al Sharpton cries following the verdict in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis

The graphic above shows the make-up of the jury that found Derek Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd on Tuesday after a grueling three-week trial. The jurors' identities have been a closely guarded secret after Judge Cahill handed down an Order of Anonymity allowing only a few key details about each person to be released publicly

The graphic above shows the make-up of the jury that found Derek Chauvin guilty of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd on Tuesday after a grueling three-week trial. The jurors’ identities have been a closely guarded secret after Judge Cahill handed down an Order of Anonymity allowing only a few key details about each person to be released publicly

With Chauvin almost certain to appeal, the politically explosive case could be far from over. With nine out of every ten appeals refused by US courts, defense attorney Nelson will face an uphill task.

Chauvin’s legal team is expected to seize on four key issues as grounds for a re-trial. The first is the location of the trial.  

While Floyd’s shocking death under Chauvin’s knee triggered months of protests across the globe, nowhere was the pain and anguish felt more acutely than in his native Minneapolis.

The ex-cop’s legal team had argued there was no way their client could get a fair trial in Hennepin County but Judge Cahill refused to move it to another city because he said the chaos and anger surrounding Chauvin would follow him wherever he went. 

MINNESOTA V  DEREK CHAUVIN – CHARGES

Second-degree murder – GUILTY  

Possible sentence: 12.5 to 40 years 

The second-degree murder charge required prosecutors to prove Chauvin caused Floyd’s death while committing or trying to commit a felony — in this case, third-degree assault. 

Prosecutors had to convince the jury that Chauvin assaulted or attempted to assault Floyd and in doing so inflicted substantial bodily harm. Prosecutors did not have to prove Chauvin was the sole cause of Floyd’s death – only that his conduct was a ‘substantial causal factor’. 

Second degree murder carries a maximum sentence of 40 years, but because Chauvin does not have any prior convictions sentencing guidelines recommend he serve 12.5 years. 

Second-degree manslaughter – GUILTY 

Possible sentence: Four to 10 years 

The manslaughter charge has a lower bar, requiring proof that Chauvin caused Floyd’s death through negligence that created an unreasonable risk, and consciously took the chance of causing severe injury or death. 

Second degree manslaughter carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison – sentencing guidelines for someone without a criminal record call for no more than four years behind bars.

Third-degree murder – GUILTY 

Possible sentence: 12.5 to 25 years 

Third-degree murder required a lower standard of proof than second-degree. To win a conviction, prosecutors needed to show only that Floyd’s death was caused by an act that was obviously dangerous, though not necessarily a felony. 

Third-degree murder carries a maximum sentence of 25 years but because Chauvin has no criminal history he would likely end up serving about 12.5. 

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Likewise, Cahill refused to delay proceedings given the unlikelihood that anyone could forget the names of those involved or harrowing video of Floyd’s last moments. 

The second issue centers around the police-shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old black man who was gunned down by a white cop on April 11 in a Minneapolis suburb just 10 miles from where Floyd was killed. 

As protests erupted over Wright’s death in the middle of Chauvin’s trial, Nelson filed a motion to sequester the jury to shield them from media coverage. 

Nelson argued that ‘the emotional response [Wright’s] case creates sets the stage for a jury to say: “I’m not going to vote not guilty, because I’m concerned about the outcome.”‘ 

Cahill decided ultimately that sequestering the jury could bring even more attention to the Brooklyn Center tragedy and denied the motion, as he had done with Nelson’s earlier previous bids for sequestration.   

Perhaps the most powerful argument for a re-trial was acknowledged by Cahill himself on Monday evening immediately after the jury was sent out to deliberate.  

It came when Nelson filed a motion for a mistrial and cited comments from Congresswoman Maxine Waters, who on the eve on closing statements attended a demonstration in Brooklyn Center and called for protesters to ‘get more confrontational’ if the Chauvin jury did not return a verdict of ‘guilty, guilty, guilty’. 

Chauvin denied the motion but said Waters may have handed the defense ‘something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned’. 

The fourth issue likely to be cited in the defense appeal took place before the trial even started, when the city of Minneapolis announced it would pay a $27million settlement to the Floyd family.  

Nelson immediately asked for the trial to be moved and postponed on the grounds that the untimely announcement would taint the jury, but his request fell on deaf ears.

Instead, it was agreed that the judge would re-voire dire the jurors already seated. Two jurors were dismissed after having admitted that they heard about the settlement and it left them unable to be impartial.

The timing of the announcement clearly enraged Judge Cahill, prompting an outburst from the bench in which he ordered both the state and defense, ‘Just stop talking about it!’ 

Ted Sampsell-Jones, a professor at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St Paul, told DailyMail.com he believes it is ‘highly unlikely’ an appellate court will overturn Chauvin’s conviction. 

‘A defendant has a right to appeal, and just about all defendants appeal, but very few of them win,’ Sampsell-Jones said. ‘Chauvin can appeal any ruling that went against him, but it is highly unlikely that his conviction will be overturned. 

‘That is in part because the appellate courts are likely to say that the evidence against him was overwhelming, so any error is harmless.’ 

The legal expert said he believes Chauvin’s main appeal will be that his constitutional right to a fair trial was violated through pretrial publicity and the fact that multiple jurors reported having negative feelings toward Chauvin during jury selection.  

The appeal could also include claims of prosecutorial misconduct and the jury failing to properly define the crimes of which Chauvin was convicted. 

‘Ordinarily an appellate lawyer will try to sort through the possible claims and maybe pick the 3 or 4 strongest to present. But Nelson may present more than that,’ he said. 

Joe Biden delivers remarks from the White House following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial in Minneapolis. The president, flanked by his vice president, Kamala Harris, said the verdict 'can be a giant step forward' for the nation, but he declared that 'it's not enough.'

Vice president Kamala Harris speaks alongside Joe Biden following the verdict last night

Joe Biden delivers remarks from the White House following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial in Minneapolis. The president, flanked by his vice president, Kamala Harris, said the verdict ‘can be a giant step forward’ for the nation, but he declared that ‘it’s not enough.’

Jurors had not sent back any questions to the judge or asked to review any of the hundreds of exhibits entered in the course of the trial.

Non-essential courthouse staff were told to go home as Minneapolis battened down ahead of the verdict, with 3,000 National Guard members and 1,100 law enforcement officers keeping a watchful eye over the city that’s been on edge for weeks awaiting the conclusion of the trial. 

Girl, 16, is shot dead by police in Columbus moments after Chauvin verdict 

Ma'Khia Bryant, 16, was shot dead by police in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday evening

Ma’Khia Bryant, 16, was shot dead by police in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday evening

Moments after the Chauvin verdict was announced news of another police-involved killing of a black American emerged. 

Sixteen-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant was declared dead in Columbus, Ohio, at around 5.20pm after she was gunned down by cops while wielding a knife. 

Cops were reportedly called to the foster home where Ma’Khia was staying after she got in an altercation with another resident there. 

The Columbus Police Department swiftly released body camera footage of the shooting in an attempt to show more transparency and ease tensions as Black Lives Matter protesters descended on the scene.  

In the footage Ma’Khia can be seen with a knife as she storms out of her home and towards another woman, with the woman falling backwards.

The teen turns her attention towards another woman at the scene and runs towards her as the officer opens fire, sending her to the ground.

People can immediately be heard screaming in shock and horror. 

The officer who opened fire was not identified. Police Chief Michael Woods said he ‘would be taken off the street’ pending an investigation.

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Tensions in the city had been raised further by the death of another black man, Daunte Wright, 20, who was shot and killed last week a few miles from where Chauvin’s trial was taking place. The officer in the shooting has been charged with manslaughter.

Moments after the Chauvin verdict was announced news of another police-involved killing of a black American emerged. 

Sixteen-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant was declared dead in Columbus, Ohio, at around 5.20pm after she was gunned down by cops while wielding a knife. Cops were reportedly called to the foster home where Ma’Khia was staying after she got in an altercation with another resident there.  

In the Chauvin case, Judge Peter Cahill is now expected to move immediately to sentencing and a so-called Blakely hearing after the state has filed a motion asking for sentences upwards of the state’s presumptive guidelines.

According to those guidelines, both second and third degree murder charges carry a sentence of 12 years, with a discretionary range between 10 and 15, while second-degree manslaughter carries a sentence of four, with a discretionary range of three to five.

Chauvin waived his right for the matter to be heard by a jury so the judge alone will consider the aggravating factors brought by the state.

The prosecutors’ motion claims that Floyd was particularly vulnerable as he was handcuffed, that he was treated with ‘particular cruelty’, that Chauvin had a position of authority, more than three people were involved and the crime was committed in front of children.

Several minors were among the bystanders that day – the youngest, nine-year-old Judeah, testified in court.  

Chauvin was handcuffed and taken away to the cells on Tuesday after Judge Cahill revoked his bail ahead of sentencing. He showed no emotion and was taken straight to the cells in Hennepin County Government Center, where the trial was held, for processing before his transfer to Oak Park Heights.

His attorneys will have to notify the trial court within 60 days if they plan to appeal. His lawyers then have months to review transcripts and court filings dating from the start of the case to build their arguments. 

Chauvin will be held at Oak Park Heights for the next eight weeks, until sentencing. 

Warning signs should have flashed around Chauvin years before he murdered Floyd. A Minneapolis police veteran of 19 years, he acted more like a ruthless Wild West sheriff than a modern day lawman.

He once pulled a gun on some teenagers who shot a toy dart out of their car window. He was a bully who belittled a breast feeding new mother.

And, in chilling echoes of what was to come, he held his knee on a black woman suspect as she begged: ‘Don’t kill me.’ 

MINNEAPOLIS: Thousands gathered at George Floyd Square, the intersection where the fatal arrest took place in May last year

MINNEAPOLIS: Thousands gathered at George Floyd Square, the intersection where the fatal arrest took place in May last year 

NEW YORK CITY: Women address crowds over loudhailers as crowds celebrated the guilty verdict hundreds of miles away

NEW YORK CITY: Women address crowds over loudhailers as crowds celebrated the guilty verdict hundreds of miles away

MINNEAPOLIS: People celebrate in the streets after the verdict came in on Tuesday afternoon

MINNEAPOLIS: People celebrate in the streets after the verdict came in on Tuesday afternoon

MINNEAPOLIS: Charles McMillan (L) and Genevieve Hansen, witnesses who testified in the trial, embrace in George Floyd Square after the verdict was read in the Derek Chauvin trial

MINNEAPOLIS: Charles McMillan (L) and Genevieve Hansen, witnesses who testified in the trial, embrace in George Floyd Square after the verdict was read in the Derek Chauvin trial

NEW YORK CITY: Protesters kneel in the streets as they celebrate the verdict in Minneapolis

NEW YORK CITY: Protesters kneel in the streets as they celebrate the verdict in Minneapolis 

NEW YORK CITY: People take to the streets following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial on April 20

NEW YORK CITY: People take to the streets following the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial on April 20

NEW YORK CITY: Demonstrators took to the streets of New York to demonstrate after the verdict came in on Tuesday evening

NEW YORK CITY: Demonstrators took to the streets of New York to demonstrate after the verdict came in on Tuesday evening

NEW YORK CITY: A woman with a sign on her bike reading, 'Guilty, guilty, guilty,' after the verdicts were delivered on Tuesday

NEW YORK CITY: A woman with a sign on her bike reading, ‘Guilty, guilty, guilty,’ after the verdicts were delivered on Tuesday

MINNEAPOLIS: People dancing in the streets in Minnesota after the guilty verdicts came in for Chauvin

MINNEAPOLIS: People dancing in the streets in Minnesota after the guilty verdicts came in for Chauvin 

Chauvin worked in one of the city’s busiest divisions, the Third Precinct, and on its toughest shift.

His desire to work the 4pm to 2am beat gained him admiration from some colleagues but saw him rack up at least 22 complaints, four times the norm.

He earned two medals of valor, but other officers said just being around him made them feel uncomfortable.

They recalled how he would leave work in uniform with his trousers pulled up higher than most people wore them. His boots were always polished, as if he expected to be inspected by the chief any minute.

He didn’t fit in with the other cops, rarely socializing and not drinking. One former colleague told The New York Times: ‘In a group setting he would never connect and stood there like a small child.’

Chauvin grew up in the Minneapolis suburb of West St Paul. His parents divorced when he was seven and his father asked for a paternity test on his sister: it turned out he was not the father.

He moved in with his accountant dad and attended four different elementary schools in five years.

After working as a US military officer in Germany he joined the Minneapolis Police Force in 2000 aged 24. 

On nights off he worked as a security guard at the city’s El Nuevo Rodeo nightclub.

Maya Santamaria, the club’s former owner, said that Chauvin was ‘nice but he would overreact and lash out quickly’, especially on nights popular with black and Latino people. 

Also working there, although it seems they did not know each other, was George Floyd.

Chauvin’s bad attitude was on display for those unfortunate enough to have come across him years before. 

Zoya Code, who is black, claims that in 2017 Chauvin put his knee on her even though she was handcuffed. A terrified Code said that she pleaded: ‘Don’t kill me.’ 

Chauvin was married to Kellie Xiong, 46, a former radiologist and beauty queen who won the Mrs Minnesota title in 2018

Chauvin was married to Kellie Xiong, 46, a former radiologist and beauty queen who won the Mrs Minnesota title in 2018

She added: ‘He just stayed on my neck.’

Frustrated and upset, she challenged him to press harder, and he did. 

‘Just to shut me up,’ she said.

She told Chauvin’s fellow officers: ‘You’re learning from an animal. That man – that’s evilness right there.’ 

In 2013 he pulled his gun on four teenagers who shot a Nerf gun dart out of their car window.

Kristofer Bergh, then 17, said that after an hour during which the teenager who fired the dart was put in the police car, Chauvin let them all off with the warning: ‘Most of you will be 18 by the end of the year. That means you’ll be old enough for ‘big boy jail’.’

Julian Hernandez claimed that Chauvin used excessive force when he arrested him at the El Nuevo Rodeo club in 2015.

He said: ‘He tried to grab me from my neck, and, of course, I reacted. And then, after that, he choked me out on the ground.’

Chauvin was formally disciplined for pulling a young mother out of her car and ridiculing her when he saw wet patches on her chest from breastfeeding.

According to Melissa Borton, Chauvin, or his colleague, told her: ‘You probably have postpartum depression, and you need help.’

Chauvin was married to Kellie Xiong, 46, a former radiologist and beauty queen who won the Mrs Minnesota title in 2018. 

She once described her husband in a local newspaper interview as ‘a softie’. 

She said: ‘He’s such a gentleman. He still opens the door for me, still puts my coat on for me.’

Her view has now changed. She filed for divorce two days after Chauvin killed Floyd.

Chauvin’s verdict came as a devastating blow to the three other officers charged in connection with Floyd’s death – Thomas Lane, 38; J Alexander Kueng, 27; and Tou Thao, 35 – who are set to face trial on charges for aiding and abetting Chauvin’s crimes in August.

NEW YORK: Spike Lee takes a photograph with children after the hearing the verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Brooklyn, New York City

NEW YORK: Spike Lee takes a photograph with children after the hearing the verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Brooklyn, New York City

Women embrace after hearing Chauvin's guilty verdict on three charges for Floyd's death on Tuesday afternoon

Women embrace after hearing Chauvin’s guilty verdict on three charges for Floyd’s death on Tuesday afternoon

A man rejoices outside Cup Foods after the jury found Chauvin guilty on Tuesday afternoon

A man rejoices outside Cup Foods after the jury found Chauvin guilty on Tuesday afternoon

People react to the Chauvin verdict outside the Hennepin County courthouse on Tuesday afternoon

People react to the Chauvin verdict outside the Hennepin County courthouse on Tuesday afternoon

People gathered outside Cup Foods cheer after the jury handed down its guilty verdict on Tuesday afternoon

People gathered outside Cup Foods cheer after the jury handed down its guilty verdict on Tuesday afternoon

Girl, 10, who watched Chauvin kill Floyd reveals how ‘proud she is’ at testifying 

The ten-year-old girl whose testimony at Derek Chauvin’s trial is being cited by prosecutors as a reason for why the cop should never leave prison says she is ‘kinda proud’ of her contribution to his conviction. 

Judeah Reynolds was nine last May when she walked to the Cup Foods store in Minneapolis with her older cousin Darnella Frazier to buy snacks. When they were there, Floyd was arrested and killed by Chauvin. 

Judeah was presented as a prosecution witness. She told the court that watching Chauvin crush Floyd’s neck made her ‘sad and kind of mad’.  

The day after Chauvin was found guilty she appeared on Good Morning America with a chaperone to talk about the trial. Asked how she felt about the verdict, she answered shyly: ‘Kinda proud’. 

She also said she was watching the verdict come in from home, with her mother and father, who told her: ‘We won’ and ‘this will bring change.’ 

 She says she is now writing a children’s book called Judeah’s Walk to the Store to ‘teach people to be brave’.

Judeah Reynolds is pictured on GMA

Judeah is pictured at the scene of Floyd's murder last May

Judeah Reynolds is pictured left on GMA and right at the scene of Floyd’s murder last May

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Over 15 days of testimony the jury of seven men and five women – six white, four black and two bi-racial – was guided through every facet over Floyd’s death through the eyes of 45 witnesses and hundreds of pieces of evidence. 

In his opening statement, trial attorney Jerry Blackwell told the jury that Chauvin had betrayed the badge he wore on his heart. 

He said the former officer had violated police policy and trampled the sanctity of human life.

For Blackwell it all boiled down to the nine minutes 29 seconds of Floyd’s subdual restraint and neck compression. 

‘You can believe your eyes’ he said, ‘That it’s a homicide, that it’s a murder.’

Not so, according to defense attorney Eric Nelson, for whom the truth could only be viewed through a far wider lens.

For Nelson this was all about reason, doubt and common sense. Common sense would tell the jury that what they had seen with their own eyes was only one part of a much bigger picture.

He said: ‘We have to examine the totality of the evidence. That’s what this case is ultimately about, the evidence. It is nothing more than that.’ 

As Nelson sought to un-pick emotions from the scenes of Floyd’s death and the testimony of a host of eyewitnesses brought by the state, a heavy fear of what might happen when the verdict came down gripped the city of Minneapolis.   

The downtown area was shored up with boards nailed over the windows of businesses and the concrete blockades, steel fences and bails of barbed wire embracing the court and government buildings.

More than 3,000 members of the National Guard were called in to bolster the 1,100 public safety officers already in place – their armored vehicles parked not only at the government buildings but in store parking lots, intersections and sidewalks across the city.

The city was reported to have spent more than $1million on security in a four-stage plan dubbed Operation Safety Net, which kicked off with jury selection and entered its final stage with the verdict announcement. 

The screw turned tighter with the April 11 shooting of Daunte Wright – the 20-year-old black man killed in a traffic stop by Brooklyn Center police barely ten miles from where Chauvin stood trial. 

Night after night the protests raged and curfews were broken in an unending echo of the civil unrest that followed Floyd’s death last May.  

‘This fight for justice is not over’: Lizzo, Whoopi Goldberg, Kerry Washington and more stars react as Derek Chauvin is found guilty 

Celebrities flooded social media on Tuesday as they reacted to the news of Chauvin being found guilty on all three charges of murder and manslaughter in death of Floyd. 

Whoopi Goldberg, Kerry Washington, Chris Evans and Mariah Carey were just some of the stars who were first to share their thoughts on Twitter, seconds after the jury in Minneapolis returned its verdict.

Scandal actress Washington, 44, tweeted: ‘A guilty #verdict. But this fight for justice is not over. We have a lot of work to do. There is more fight ahead of us. But RIGHT NOW please take CARE of yourself. And let’s take care of each other. Prayers and love to the family of #GeorgeFloyd.’ 

The View host Goldberg, 65, told her followers: ‘Guilty Guilty Guilty… No one wins.. George Floyd is still gone.. and finally someone was responsible… Derek Chauvin.’ 

Goldberg’s Republican co-host Meghan McCain simply tweeted: ‘May justice heal our nation.’

Stars react: Whoopi Goldberg, Kerry Washington and more stars react as Derek Chauvin is found guilty on ALL three charges of murder and manslaughter in death of George Floyd

Stars react: Whoopi Goldberg, Kerry Washington and more stars react as Derek Chauvin is found guilty on ALL three charges of murder and manslaughter in death of George Floyd

Thankful: Oprah Winfrey took to Instagram with an older picture of Floyd donning a tuxedo, expressing her relief after the verdict was read

Thankful: Oprah Winfrey took to Instagram with an older picture of Floyd donning a tuxedo, expressing her relief after the verdict was read 

Oprah Winfrey took to Instagram with an older picture of Floyd donning a tuxedo, expressing her relief after the verdict was read.

‘Relieved – and emotional in ways I didn’t expect,’ she said. ‘I cried tears of joy as each verdict was read. I’m grateful to the witnesses and their testimonies. Grateful to every Juror for seeing and acknowledging what the world saw on that tape. Thank you God for real!’

Meanwhile, Oscar-winner Viola Davis lead reactions on Instagram who posted a painting of Floyd with the caption: ‘GUILTY!!!! As it should!! Now….rest in peace George Floyd. Rest. You and your family have been vindicated.’ 

In an emotional video posted to Instagram, Grammy winner Lizzo spoke directly to her 10.2million followers, while holding back her tears. 

She captioned the post: ‘Thank you to all the organizations dedicated to the protest and protection of black people. Twin cities you have been through so much. Nothing to say here but I love you. Rest in power George Floyd.’ 

Activism: Scandal star Kerry Washington also shared this call to action on her Instagram page as well as reacting on Twitter. Amy Schumer posted the same infographic

Activism: Scandal star Kerry Washington also shared this call to action on her Instagram page as well as reacting on Twitter. Amy Schumer posted the same infographic 

Speaking out: Sharon Stone said 'thank you for justice' in her Instagram post

Political: Rapper Megan Thee Stallion posted her thoughts to Instagram

Speaking out: Sharon Stone (left) and Megan Thee Stallion (right) shared their reactions to the verdict on Instagram 

Kerry Washington also took to her Instagram page to share a graphic that read ‘We have a verdict. Now what?’ which contained a call to action for her followers, urging them to help pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. 

Mariah Carey also shared the same graphic, adding to her Instagram Stories: ‘Thank you because we need this. Sending love and prayers to the Floyd family. This is a day that will never be forgotten.. Believing something good will come out of this tragedy.. it’s a start. Praise the Lord!’ 

Oscar-winning actor Jamie Foxx posted his reaction to the verdict, which he called a ‘bittersweet moment’ in a response on Instagram. 

‘I am happy and relieved that the person that did this horrendous thing to you and your family was found guilty,’ Foxx began his post. 

‘The bitter is that we cannot bring you back… The bitter is all of the lives that were affected by what happened to you… all the tears that have been shed… and hearts broken…’

He continued: ‘But through prayer and faithful people… Today with the announcement of this Verdict gives us some type of hope… hope that we can start righting the wrongs that have been in place for years in this country… rest in power George… And know that your words resonated around the whole world…’

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‘This is not justice’: Democrats Cori Bush, Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez react to guilty verdict in Derek Chauvin trial and seek further steps in racial equality 

Members of the so-called progressive ‘squad’ of House Democrats reacted to the Derek Chauvin guilty verdicts on Tuesday by calling for further actions toward racial equality and claiming ‘this is not justice.’

Rep. Cori Bush, a Democrat from Missouri, gave a press conference with fellow members of the Black Caucus following the Chauvin verdict in which she simply called it a ‘step’ to further racial equality.

‘This verdict is a step. It’s a popping of the lock to be able to get to the place where we can open the door and really start to do the work to save lives,’ Bush said.

‘And so, this egregious murder that happened, we can call it murder now, this egregious murder that happened it should not be that it has to look like that in order for us to have some type of semblance of what people call justice.’

Bush continued: ‘This was accountability, but it is not yet justice. Justice for us, it’s saving lives.’

Ayanna Pressley was filmed in a pink blazer crying as she hugged Bush after the two heard the announcement of the verdict.

Omar also tweeted about a number of steps and goals to addressing racial inequalities and police injustices

Omar also tweeted about a number of steps and goals to addressing racial inequalities and police injustices

Progressive Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley also responded to the verdict announcement on Tuesday

Progressive Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley also responded to the verdict announcement on Tuesday

‘The moment we heard the verdict, we held each other. This feeling is not easy. But all of us will carry each other through this,’ Bush tweeted.

Pressley tweeted: ‘Black men, I love you, and you deserve to grow old.’

Ilhan Omar, whose district covers Minneapolis, said that the verdicts felt ‘different for our community’ and that ‘justice feels new and long overdue.’

‘Rejoice, my beloved community. Grateful to @AGEllison, jurors, and everyone who made this possible. Alhamdulillah! [Praise be to God],’ Omar tweeted.

However, Omar called the verdicts a ‘minuscule step on the path to justice’ and wrote a list of a series of police reforms and other goals she hopes can be met towards racial equality.

Among those goals, Omar called for an ‘independent agency to investigate police misuse of force’ and to ‘criminalize violence against protesters,’ as well as calling on officials to ‘demilitarize police departments’ and ‘disband and deconstruct failed police departments.’

Omar also called for a number of other measures and police reforms including: ending traffic stops for minor equipment violations, federal investigations into departments who utilize practices like arrest quotas, banning all racial profiling, restoring felony voting rights, and end mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, another member of the ‘squad’, went onto Instagram Live to address the verdict.

‘This is not justice, and I’ll explain to you why it’s not justice,’ Ocasio-Cortez said.

‘It’s not justice because justice is George Floyd going home tonight to be with his family. Justice is Adam Toledo getting tucked in by his mom tonight.’

The New York congresswoman added: ‘Justice is when you’re pulled over, there not being a gun as part of that interaction because you have a headlight out. Justice is your school system not having or being a part of the schools-to-prison pipeline.’

Ocasio-Cortez said that 'it's not justice because justice is George Floyd going home tonight to be with his family'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez went onto Instagram Live to address the verdict

Ocasio-Cortez said that ‘it’s not justice because justice is George Floyd going home tonight to be with his family’

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Twelve jurors in Derek Chauvin’s trial will remain anonymous for now: The seven women and five men were praised by judge for ‘heavy duty service’ but could face trauma dealing with aftermath of the case, experts warn 

The 12 jurors who found Chauvin guilty remained anonymous as they return to normal life following the grueling three-week trial – but their identities likely won’t be sealed forever. 

Judge Peter Cahill described it as ‘heavy duty jury service,’ when he dismissed the jury after they handed down their verdict on Tuesday.

For 16 days the group entered Cahill’s courtroom by a guarded, private entrance, surely aware of the security measures and growing crowds as the trial progressed.

On Tuesday evening they left the courthouse for the final time under the armed guard of Hennepin County Sheriff department deputies who have been by their side throughout. 

Drawn from a pool of 300 potential jurors their identities have been a closely guarded secret after Judge Cahill handed down an Order of Anonymity allowing only a few key details about each person to be released publicly. 

The jury was made up of five men and seven women – six white, four black and two bi-racial. They included a chemist, a nurse, an auditor and a grandmother. 

Now that the trial has concluded the jurors’ full identities could come to light should Judge Cahill decide to lift that order, or should they choose to speak out.  

Experts have warned that the jurors could experience lasting trauma from the trial, which saw them hear hours of tearful testimony and examine hundreds of graphic images before they ultimately faced the monumental task of deciding Chauvin’s fate while the world watched on tenterhooks.  

Patricia Frazier, a psychology professor at the University of Minnesota who studies stress and trauma and also serves as an expert on sexual assault cases, explained the toll a high-profile trial like Chauvin’s can take in an interview with the Minneapolis Star-Tribune

‘You have this trauma exposure, and you have the pressure of the decision, and the worldwide scrutiny, and the consequences for racial justice, and the lack of your typical coping strategies and support,’ Frazier said.  

‘There is vicarious trauma exposure. You can’t look away. You can’t take the day off, you can’t talk to anybody about it.’

Evidence of that stress came out on the third day of testimony when Judge Cahill was forced to call a break after Juror 44 – a white woman in her 50s – suddenly stood up and complained of a ‘stress-related reaction’. 

The woman explained that she had been awake since 2am that day – after the jury was exposed to the first of many graphic videos of Floyd crying out under the weight of Chauvin’s knee during an arrest on May 25, 2020.   

Though this was the first trial in Minnesota to allow cameras into proceedings the jurors were never once on screen. Thanks to Covid-19 restrictions of plexiglass and distancing not even the attorneys had a view of all 12 and the two alternates who sat through proceedings.

They were seated in the order of their selection and are known only by numbers.

Defense attorney Eric Nelson repeatedly asked for this jury to be sequestered during the trial and repeatedly his request fell on deaf ears.

Instead they were allowed to return to their homes each night and received a $20 stipend for each day of service. 

In the end the jurors spent just one night in sequestration after they rendered their verdict on the second day of their deliberations.

Speaking after they had done so, Attorney General Keith Ellison added his thanks to that already expressed by Judge Cahill.

He said, ‘We owe our thanks to the jury. They now deserve to return to their lives. If they ask you to respect their privacy we ask you to honor that request.’

The jurors names will be released at a time to be determined by the judge.

Upon departure from the court on Tuesday the jury were handed a flyer by the Minnesota Judicial Branch entitled ‘Called to Serve: Coping with Jury Duty’. 

The flyer warns that jurors often experience ‘temporary symptoms of distress’ in the aftermath of a trial and urges them to keep an eye out for those symptoms, which include: anxiety, sleep or appetite changes, irritability, headaches and stomachaches and low energy. 

Other symptoms listed were: second guessing the outcome, feeling guilty, fear, a desire to be by yourself and decreased concentration or memory problems. 

Coping mechanisms suggested on the form include keeping in touch with other jurors after the trial; talking to family and friends about symptoms; returning to a normal schedule; cutting down on alcohol, caffeine and nicotine; and breathing exercises.

The jury: What we know about the five men and seven women who sealed Chauvin’s fate

Juror 2 is a white man in his twenties. He was the first juror seated and also the only one who during jury selection said he hadn’t ever seen bystander video of Floyd’s death. 

Juror 2 is a chemist who has a combined degree in environmental studies and chemistry and works in a lab where he tests samples for contaminants that may be harmful to the environment or worker hygiene. 

He said he enjoys outdoor activities, including Ultimate Frisbee, backpacking and biking. He and his fiancée visited George Floyd Square because Floyd’s arrest was such a ‘transformative event for that area’.

Juror 9 is a bi-racial woman in her twenties who has Type 1 diabetes and grew up in a small town in northern Minnesota where her uncle serves as a police officer. 

During jury selection she admitted to being ‘super excited’ at the prospect of sitting on the jury described herself as a ‘go-with-the-flow, open-minded type of person’.  

She said she only watched the bystander video once, and it gave her a ‘somewhat negative’ impression of Chauvin. She said ‘that video just makes you sad. Nobody wants to see somebody die, whether it was his fault or not’. She said there could be other possible explanations for Chauvin’s actions, suggesting that Floyd might have been resisting, or civilian lives may have been in danger.

Juror 19 is a white man in his 30s who said he had a ‘somewhat negative view’ of Chauvin and supports Black Lives Matter in general but disagrees with some of the ways group members go about things during his voire dire. He has an unfavorable opinion of Blue Lives Matter.

Juror 19 said he has a ‘friend of a friend’ who works for Minneapolis police but that he had not discussed the case with him. He wrote in his questionnaire that he heard Floyd was on hard drugs, but said he doesn’t believe it should have much impact on the case. ‘Whether you are under the influence of drugs doesn’t determine whether you should be living or dead,’ he said.

As an auditor, Juror 19 said he tries to resolve conflict and make decisions based on facts, not emotions.  

Juror 27 is a black man in his 30s who immigrated to America 14 years ago and went to school in Nebraska before moving to Minnesota in 2012.  He works as a manager of eight people in IT security, speaks multiple languages including French, has a wife and a dog, and is a fan of the Minnesota Gophers and Vikings. 

Juror 27 had seen video of Floyd’s death and recalled telling his wife at the time: ‘That could have been me, or anyone else.’ He said he had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin based on the video and that he hoped to learn at trial more about events that led up to Floyd’s arrest.

Juror 44 is a white woman in her 50s and single mother of two teenage sons who is an executive in a non-profit health-care advocacy group. She said that she had discussed white privilege with a black co-worker to whom she is close. She also said she had prior professional dealings with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in her job, but said it would not affect her impartiality.

Juror 44 said she was exposed to a lot of news about this case, adding that the media is biased and doesn’t have all the facts. She saw only part of the bystander video and said she has empathy for both Floyd and Chauvin. She said she had a somewhat negative view of Chauvin and a neutral opinion of Floyd, saying he was not a model citizen but didn’t ‘deserve to die’.

She said she strongly agrees that the criminal justice system is biased against racial and ethnic minorities. ‘Not all police are bad,’ she said. ‘I don’t want them terrorized or disrespected. But bad police need to go.’

Juror 52 is a black man in his 30s who works in banking, coaches youth sports and writes creatively for a hobby, including scripts and poetry.  

He said he had neutral opinions on Chauvin and Floyd. He said he had not seen the bystander video in its entirety but had seen clips of it two or three times. He said he had not posted about it on social media but had talked with family and friends and he wrote in his questionnaire that his opinion has been ‘why didn’t the other officers stop Chauvin.’

‘I don’t know if he was doing something wrong or not, but somebody died … Even if you have no intention of doing something and something happens, somebody could’ve still intervened and prevented that,’ he said. He has a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: ‘Black lives just want to be treated as equals and not killed or treated in an aggressive manner simply because they are black.’

Juror 55 is a white woman in her 50s, a single mother of two who works as an executive assistant at a healthcare clinic, sells Pampered Chef and rides a motorbike in memory of her late husband with whom she once shared the pastime. 

She said she was disturbed by the bystander video but didn’t see the full thing because ‘I just couldn’t watch it anymore. She said she had been scared by the unrest that overwhelmed Minneapolis last May and also admitted to having formed a ‘somewhat negative view of Chauvin’  because she feels he could’ve handled the situation differently. 

Still, she said she wouldn’t be able to form an opinion until she has all of the facts. She has a basic trust in police officers, and a somewhat unfavorable view of Black Lives Matter, saying: ‘All lives matter to me. It doesn’t matter who they are or what they are.’

Juror 79 is a black man in his 40s and a father who works in management and immigrated to the Twin Cities from West Africa 20 years ago. He claimed to be entirely neutral when it came to Chauvin and said that he had, ‘no opinion’ as to the cause of Floyd’s death. 

Juror 79 said he lives in a suburb and his home was burglarized once and police responded appropriately, even though the suspect was never caught. He said he trusts police, but also feels it’s appropriate for jurors to evaluate an officer’s actions. ‘I would say it’s another pair of eyes and a new mind just looking at the action,’ he said. 

He said he would tell his son – who was about to take driver’s education – that when police stop him, he should cooperate. When asked if people who don’t cooperate have themselves to blame, he said: ‘Cooperation is good. … You help everybody.’

Juror 85 is a biracial woman in her 40s who is married with a small child, grew up in a river town and attended college in Wisconsin, and works as a consultant to companies undergoing reorganizations and other transitions.

She said she has a neutral view of Floyd, writing in her questionnaire that she knew he died ‘as a result of this encounter’ but did not know what his actions were before it happened. When pressed if she thought Chauvin was responsible, she said: ‘No, I never heard what a cause of death was.’

She said she has a pretty strong faith in police, but that they are human and can make mistakes. She said she would generally agree that if someone does not cooperate, he or she might have themselves to blame. ‘You respect police and you do what they ask,’ she said.

Juror 89 is white woman in her 50s who lives in a suburb and as a cardiac nurse works with ventilated patients, including those with COVID-19. 

Despite having formed no opinion on how Floyd died said she had seen some of the video and admitted that her training would influence her views on whether Chauvin administered basic first aid training and in her assessment of when it became necessary to do so. 

She was questioned extensively about her experience as a nurse, whether she has ever resuscitated anyone and how she would view medical evidence in the case. The woman said she would draw upon her knowledge to evaluate medical testimony, but said she would refrain from using her knowledge in the jury room.

She said she somewhat disagrees that it’s not right to second-guess decisions officers make.

Juror 91 is a black woman and grandmother in her 60s who has a relative who serves as a Minneapolis Police officer but to whom she said she was not close. She studied child psychology and worked in marketing before she retired, and she felt strongly that being on a jury was her civic duty. 

The woman, who volunteers with underserved youth, said she watched the bystander video of Floyd’s arrest for about four or five minutes, then shut it off because ‘it just wasn’t something that I needed to see’.

She grew up about 10 or 15 blocks from the site of Floyd’s arrest, but said she moved decades ago and has no reason to revisit the area. She had a very favorable view of Black Lives Matter, writing in her questionnaire ‘I am Black and my life matters,’ though she said she is not familiar with the organization.  

Juror 92, the final juror seated is a white woman in her 40s who admitted to having heard about the city’s $27million civil settlement with the Floyd family but said it would not bias her and that she could remain neutral. She said she had watched the video of Floyds death at least four or five times but when asked what media coverage she was aware of she said only that Chauvin was ‘an aggressive cop with tax problems.’ 

She said she has experience with someone who struggled with alcohol, and might view someone who uses drugs with caution, out of fear they could act violently or aggressively when under the influence. Still, she said, she doesn’t agree that someone who uses drugs or doesn’t cooperate with police should be treated poorly. ‘If someone uses drugs, I don’t think there should be ramifications of violence for that,’ she said.

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‘I’m not celebrating, I’m relieved’: Maxine Waters reacts to Chauvin’s guilty verdicts as she avoids House censure over trial comments

Waters said Tuesday she was ‘not celebrating’ following the guilty verdict in the Chauvin case – days after her own call for protesters to get ‘confrontational’ caused an uproar. 

She made the comment after the 12-member jury who heard the case pronounced the former police officer guilty on three counts. 

‘You know, someone said it better than me, I’m not celebrating, I’m relieved,’ she said. 

Her statement came after Waters and Democratic leaders also found relief on the House floor – after a motion to censure the longtime Democratic officeholder failed narrowly in the closely divided House. 

House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy moved Tuesday to formally censure Waters for her comments urging protesters to ‘get more confrontational’ depending on the outcome of the Chauvin trial. He moved quickly to force the issue, after a host of GOP lawmakers condemned the comments.

The House voted to table, or kill, the effort on a party-line 216-210 party line vote. 

The result was to temporarily set aside an effort that would have served as a high-profile rebuke by the Congress, although lawmakers could still seek other measures.   

The resolution quoted from Judge Peter Cahill, who presided over the trial, and who told the defense Waters ‘may have given you something on appeal.’ The House vote came just as the nation was bracing for a verdict in the Chauvin trial for the killing of George Floyd. The nation heard the outcome just minutes after the House vote.

California Rep. Maxine Waters presided over a House Financial Services Committee hearing Tuesday, as Republicans demanded she lose her committee seats or be kicked out of Congress for her call for protesters to 'stay confrontational.' The House voted to table a resolution to censure her over the comments

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif. moved Tuesday to censure Waters – which drew an immediate tabling motion on the House floor

California Rep. Maxine Waters (left) presided over a House Financial Services Committee hearing Tuesday, as Republicans demanded she lose her committee seats or be kicked out of Congress for her call for protesters to ‘stay confrontational.’ The House voted to table a resolution to censure her over the comments. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California (right) moved Tuesday to censure Waters – which drew an immediate tabling motion on the House floor

If censured, Waters would have been be required to appear in the well of the House – a solemn repercussion the House last experienced in the censure of former Rep. Charlie Rangel of New York.

Democrats needed to hold together nearly their entire majority, given their razor-thin margin. In a sign of how little room for error they had, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer were seen outside the doors of the chamber where they could see lawmakers entering.

McCarthy tweeted out the resolution earlier Tuesday, writing: ‘Chairwoman Waters’ actions are beneath the dignity of this institution. They raised the potential for violence, directed lawlessness, and may have interfered with a co-equal branch of government.’

Democrats immediately pointed the finger at McCarthy for failing to take any action against Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia after her own past comments about Q Anon, slavery, George Soros, and Muslims were unearthed. The House ultimately voted to strip Greene of her panel assignments. 

McCarthy’s move got a stern rebuke from Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-Mich.), the chair of the Democratic caucus. ‘Clean up your mess, Kevin,’ he said in words directed at McCarthy. ‘Sit this one out. You’ve got no credibility,’ he said, pointing to GOP members like Greene with their own issues.

‘Lauren Boebert is a mess. Matt Gaetz is a mess. Marjorie Taylor Greene is a mess,’ Jeffries said, referencing a trio of GOP lawmakers.    

Barack and Michelle Obama insist the jury did ‘the right thing’ in finding Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts and call for the elimination of racial bias 

Barack and Michelle Obama have said the jury did ‘the right thing’ in finding Chauvin guilty on all charges but said more needs to be done.

In a joint statement released after the verdict was announced, they said: ‘For almost a year, Floyd’s death under the knee of a police officer has reverberated around the world — inspiring murals and marches, sparking conversations in living rooms and new legislation.’

‘But a more basic question has always remained: would justice be done?’

Barack and Michelle Obama have said the jury did 'the right thing' in finding Derek Chauvin guilty on all charges but said more needs to be done

Barack and Michelle Obama have said the jury did ‘the right thing’ in finding Derek Chauvin guilty on all charges but said more needs to be done

In a joint statement released after the verdict was announced, they said: 'For almost a year, George Floyd's death under the knee of a police officer has reverberated around the world — inspiring murals and marches, sparking conversations in living rooms and new legislation.'

In a joint statement released after the verdict was announced, they said: ‘For almost a year, George Floyd’s death under the knee of a police officer has reverberated around the world — inspiring murals and marches, sparking conversations in living rooms and new legislation.’

‘In this case, at least, we have our answer. But if we’re being honest with ourselves, we know that true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial.’

The pair called for ‘concrete reforms’ in policing and for the elimination of racial bias from the nation’s criminal justice system.

‘Michelle and I send our prayers to the Floyd family, and we stand with all those who are committed to guaranteeing every American the full measure of justice that George and so many others have been denied,’ he said.

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Nancy Pelosi THANKS George Floyd for ‘sacrificing your life for justice’ in bizarre statement after Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi bizarrely thanked George Floyd for ‘sacrificing your life for justice’ in remarks after Derek Chauvin was found guilty of three counts of murder and manslaughter.

‘Thank God the jury validated what we saw,’ Pelosi said at a press conference on Capitol Hill, referring to the video of Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck for almost nine minutes.

‘Thank you George Floyd for sacrificing your life for justice, for being there to call out to your mom,’ she said. 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi bizarrely thanked George Floyd for 'sacrificing your life for justice' in remarks after Derek Chauvin was found guilty

Speaker Nancy Pelosi bizarrely thanked George Floyd for ‘sacrificing your life for justice’ in remarks after Derek Chauvin was found guilty

‘Because of you and because of thousands, millions of people around the world who came out for justice, your name will always be synonymous with justice,’ she added.

Pelosi said she spoke to the Floyd family Tuesday afternoon.  

‘Around three o’clock I spoke to the family, to say to them: thank you. God bless you for your grace and your dignity,’ she said.

She made her comments surrounded by members of the Congressional Black Caucus. The lawmakers watched the verdict together in a room off the Capitol.  

The speaker and other black lawmakers called for police reform, including the passage of The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. 

‘This is the first step,’ Democratic Rep. Joyce Beatty, the head of the Congressional Black Caucus, said of the verdict. ‘Today we start to change the world.’ 

The legislation would prohibit choke holds and no-knock warrants at the federal level, limit them at the state and local level, and restrict the use of qualified immunity, a legal shield for police against civil suits. 

Congress has limited power to regulate the police, most of whom fall under state jurisdiction.  

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