https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10719113/Border-Patrol-talks-roll-hi-tech-smart-walls-detect-intruders.html

EXCLUSIVE: ‘You can’t have boots on the ground everywhere!’ Border Patrol is in talks to roll out hi-tech ‘smart walls’ that detect intruders climbing walls or building tunnels and launch drones to catch coyotes and drug-runners at remote crossings

  • Technology company DarkPulse claims it has pitched its sophisticated fiber-optic ‘smart wall’ cables to Department of Homeland Security officials 
  • They claim to offer a solution to policing miles of remote and unprotected US borders in states like Arizona
  • ‘You need a barrier, because you can’t have boots on the ground everywhere,’ CEO Dennis O’Leary said. ‘Any schmuck with a shovel can dig underneath a wall’
  • DarkPulse’s technology works by sending pulses of light down glass tubes, and gleaning information back to build up an x-ray picture of the area 
  • ‘I can run a piece of cable thousands of kilometers. And either somebody crossed or they didn’t, there’s no false alarm,’ O’Leary said 

Border Patrol is in talks to roll out hi-tech ‘smart walls’ that can detect intruders approaching on foot or in underground tunnels, and launch autonomous drones with facial recognition to catch coyotes and drug-runners.

Technology company DarkPulse claims it has pitched its sophisticated fiber-optic cables to Department of Homeland Security officials as a solution to policing miles of remote and unprotected US borders in states like Arizona.

CEO Dennis O’Leary told DailyMail.com exclusively that the technology can create an x-ray-style picture of an area just by burying a small and near-undetectable cable in the ground.

The technology would allow Border Patrol officers to scan miles of the US southern border in real time using VR-headsets which O’Leary likened to Batman’s ‘Batvision’.

‘You need a barrier, because you can’t have boots on the ground everywhere,’ he said. ‘But any schmuck with a shovel can dig underneath a wall.

‘And because there’s parts of that wall that are so remote, you can’t get eyes on it. So you need some sort of technology that’s going to alert you to somebody tampering with the wall.

‘I can run a piece of cable thousands of kilometers. And either somebody crossed or they didn’t, there’s no false alarm.’

Technology company DarkPulse claims it has pitched its sophisticated fiber-optic ‘smart wall’ cables to Department of Homeland Security officials as a solution to policing miles of remote and unprotected US borders in states like Arizona

DarkPulse's technology works by sending pulses of light down glass tubes, and gleaning information from the way the light is reflected back to build up an x-ray picture of the area around the tube

DarkPulse’s technology works by sending pulses of light down glass tubes, and gleaning information from the way the light is reflected back to build up an x-ray picture of the area around the tube

Its first commercial use is in a bridge currently being built near Sacramento, California, in a partnership with CalTrans. Workers at the Sacramento Bridge are seen building the technology

Its first commercial use is in a bridge currently being built near Sacramento, California, in a partnership with CalTrans. Workers at the Sacramento Bridge are seen building the technology 

DarkPulse’s technology works by sending pulses of light down glass tubes, and gleaning information from the way the light is reflected back to build up an x-ray picture of the area around the tube.

‘In Arizona there’s a lot of tunnels coming from Mexico, from the drug cartels. In those areas, you would add the tunnel detection,’ O’Leary said.

CEO Dennis O'Leary told DailyMail.com that the technology can create an x-ray-style picture of an area just by burying a small and near-undetectable cable in the ground

CEO Dennis O’Leary told DailyMail.com that the technology can create an x-ray-style picture of an area just by burying a small and near-undetectable cable in the ground

‘We would actually see the footfall of somebody crossing,’ he added. ‘We could take that bearing and track that person, and then communicate with the security group on the ground and let them know exactly where that intruder is headed.

‘Drones can be placed along a perimeter of the border in a garage. As soon as there’s an alert we can launch a drone with facial recognition and follow.

‘We have drones that are pilot-driven. The capability of the drone could be a set pattern. Or it could be an autonomous type of deployment – without giving too much away.

‘We are in talks with several agencies. One is Homeland Security. But there’s other agencies that are interested in the tech for monitoring different areas as well.’

DHS did not respond to a request for comment.

O’Leary said DarkPulse’s technology can also be used in buildings to monitor their structural integrity.

Its first commercial use is in a bridge currently being built near Sacramento, California, in a partnership with CalTrans.

As cement is poured into pillars that will hold up the Honcut Bridge in Loma Rica, DarkPulse cables are being inserted and are detecting any air pockets or fault lines forming in the cement.

When finished, the bridge will be wired up with cables mapping ‘almost every square inch’ of the structure, allowing engineers to monitor it for safety – and even detect the weight and speed of vehicles driving over it.

‘You can put on a VR headset, and virtually walk the structure,’ O’Leary said. ‘You’re able to look down into the bridge and see what’s going on inside, almost like an x-ray.

‘The interface, it is like a Batman movie,’ he added. ‘You can zoom in, zoom out, you can flip this thing 360 degrees.’

As cement is poured into pillars that will hold up the Honcut Bridge in Loma Rica, DarkPulse cables are being inserted and are detecting any air pockets or fault lines forming in the cement

As cement is poured into pillars that will hold up the Honcut Bridge in Loma Rica, DarkPulse cables are being inserted and are detecting any air pockets or fault lines forming in the cement 

'In Arizona there's a lot of tunnels coming from Mexico, from the drug cartels. In those areas, you would add the tunnel detection,' O'Leary said. The U.S-Mexico border is pictured in Douglas, Arizona

‘In Arizona there’s a lot of tunnels coming from Mexico, from the drug cartels. In those areas, you would add the tunnel detection,’ O’Leary said. The U.S-Mexico border is pictured in Douglas, Arizona 

The company has projects in Egypt where entire buildings will be wired up with the fiber-optic cables, allowing engineers to ‘virtually walk in and see through walls and floors’.

The CEO, who has been working on the technology for 12 years, said the sensors constantly collect data, building up a database of how buildings react to different forces, allowing future engineering to be based not on rough predictions but on real-world information.

‘We understand what the stress and strain and temperature does to each little piece and part,’ he said.

He added that the system will allow safety workers to determine which buildings are unsafe after an earthquake or other natural disasters, and could spot early warning signs to prevent catastrophes like the Surfside condo building collapse in Miami last June.

‘Had the system been installed at the time, we could have alerted to a change in the structure,’ he said. ‘That would easily save lives. Maybe not prevent the building from collapsing, but at least give out an alert to get people out to safety.’

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