https://hannity.com/media-room/not-losing-sleep-over-it-biden-boder-chief-accused-of-skipping-sleeping-through-meetings-on-crisis/

Chris Magnus, head of U.S. Customs and Border Protection since April 2021, has come under fire lately as his colleagues have exposed some of his terrible work habits —including sleeping through meetings.

“He’s not in the game,” ​one administration official​ told the outlet. “Every time there’s a meeting and he’s in it, we’ll get to a conclusion and Magnus will have some sidebar issue that he wants to raise and we’re all like ‘What the f​–k is that about?’”

“The report also claimed that six officials had seen Magnus nod off in ‘multiple’ meetings about the border, including one concerning the surge in Venezuelans attempting to enter the US,” The New York Post reports.

From The New York Post:

Magnus​​ was confirmed by the Senate in December 2021 by a narrow 50-47 vote, but he was grilled during contentious confirmation hearings over his defense of sanctuary cities and resistance to the Trump administration’s hard-line immigration policies.

Even as the number of arrests at the border reaches record highs this year, officials claim Magnus is content to pass the buck to other agencies rather than dealing with the situation, the report said.

At one point, Magnus reportedly gave Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas a load of complaints and grievances about Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency responsible for arresting and holding illegal immigrants inside the United States.

CBP, which is responsible for border security, and ICE are under the umbrella of DHS.

Magnus offered a comment to Politico about the bombshell report.

“I’ve always been someone who aggressively questions the status quo, looks for ways to do things better, and engages directly with the public and workforce,” he said. “In any organization, some people are threatened by this. They don’t like it when someone questions ‘why’ certain things must be done the way they’ve always been done. I’m not here to back down to the predictable challenges from those people.”

“Ironically, the most common complaint I’ve received from colleagues is about my tendency to ask too many questions in meetings and my desire to know what some believe is more than necessary on various topics,” ​he said, insisting that he plans “to remain fully engaged in the work of leading CBP and advocating on behalf of those who work here as well as for the American public.”

Yeah…but the naps? C’MON MAN!

More over at The New York Post:

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