https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11476925/Hawaiis-Mauna-Loa-volcano-begins-eruption-alert-level-raised-USGS.html

The world’s largest active volcano, Mauna Loa, erupts in Hawaii for first time in 38 years triggering more than a DOZEN earthquakes

  • Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano, erupted on Monday morning on the island of Hawaii 
  • United States Geological Survey says there is no risk of magma fall but an ash fall advisory is in place
  • Residents on the Big Island were woken by earthquakes and an amber sky as a result of the eruption

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Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano in the world, has erupted for the first time in 38 years, triggering an ash fall warning and multiple earthquakes on Hawaii’s main island. 

The eruption began in the summit caldera of Mauna Loa late on Sunday night. 

Currently, the US Geological Survey does not believe there is any risk of magma fall, but an ash fall advisory has been issued. 

‘At this time, lava flows are contained within the summit area and are not threatening downslope communities. Winds may carry volcanic gas and possibly fine ash and Pele’s hair downwind.

‘Residents at risk from Mauna Loa lava flows should review preparedness and refer to Hawai‘i County Civil Defense information for further guidance. 

‘Based on past events, the early stages of a Mauna Loa eruption can be very dynamic and the location and advance of lava flows can change rapidly.

Hawaii’s Mauna Loa – the world’s largest active volcano – has erupted, the U.S. Geological Service’s (USGS) volcanic activity service has said. Pictured: An image released by the USGS shows the lava flow from Sunday night’s eruption

The sky on Hawaii's largest island in the early hours of Monday morning after Mauna Loa, the world's largest active volcano, erupted for the first time in 38 years

The sky on Hawaii’s largest island in the early hours of Monday morning after Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano, erupted for the first time in 38 years

Residents awoke to earthquakes in the early hours of Monday morning after the eruption. There is currently no risk of magma fall, according to the US Geological Survey

Residents awoke to earthquakes in the early hours of Monday morning after the eruption. There is currently no risk of magma fall, according to the US Geological Survey 

A webcam view of the eruption on Mauna Loa on Monday morning. This shows the caldera of the volcano as it erupted

A webcam view of the eruption on Mauna Loa on Monday morning. This shows the caldera of the volcano as it erupted 

‘If the eruption remains in Moku‘āweoweo, lava flows will most likely be confined within the caldera walls.

The volcano is found on Hawaii's largest island. On Monday morning, the glow from the eruption was visible 40 miles away on the coast in Kona

The volcano is found on Hawaii’s largest island. On Monday morning, the glow from the eruption was visible 40 miles away on the coast in Kona

‘However, if the eruptive vents migrate outside its walls, lava flows may move rapidly downslope,’ The National Weather Service in Honolulu said in a warning this morning. 

The NWS is warning residents with respiratory illness to stay indoors. 

‘People with respiratory illnesses should remain indoors to avoid inhaling the ash particles and anyone outside should cover their mouth and nose with a mask or cloth.

‘Possible harm to crops and animals. Minor equipment and infrastructure damage. Reduced visibility. Widespread clean-up may be necessary.’ 

Residents awoke in the middle of the night to a bright orange sky. Many shared their photos and videos on Twitter, with some as far as Kona – on the coast – able to see the magma burning.

Over a dozen earthquakes of more than 2.5 magnitude struck the region in the last two hours, according to the USGS, with one measuring 4.2 in magnitude.

Pictured: Molten rock flows from Mauna Loa, located on the south-central part of the island of Hawaii, on March 26, 1984, the last time the volcano erupted

Pictured: Molten rock flows from Mauna Loa, located on the south-central part of the island of Hawaii, on March 26, 1984, the last time the volcano erupted 

Scientists had been on alert because of a recent spike in earthquakes at the summit of the volcano, which last erupted in 1984. 

Mauna Loa is one of five volcanoes that together make up the Big Island of Hawaii, which is the southernmost island in the Hawaiian archipelago.

At 13,679 feet above the Pacific Ocean, it is not the tallest (that title goes to Mauna Kea) but it’s the largest and makes up about half of the island’s land mass.

It sits immediately north of Kilauea volcano, which is currently erupting from its summit crater. Kilauea is well-known for a 2018 eruption that destroyed 700 homes and sent rivers of lava spreading across farms and into the ocean.

Some of Mauna Loa’s slopes are much steeper than Kilauea’s so when it erupts, its lava can flow much faster. During a 1950 eruption, the mountain’s lava traveled 15 miles to the ocean in less than three hours. 

Mauna Loa last erupted 38 years ago in April 1984, sending a flow of lava within 5 miles of the city of Hilo. In written history, dating to 1843, it’s erupted 33 times. 

The Big Island is mostly rural and is home to cattle ranches, coffee farms and beach resorts. 

It’s about 200 miles (320 kilometers) south of Hawaii’s most populous island, Oahu, where the state capital Honolulu and beach resort Waikiki are both located. 

Pictured: A map showing lava flow hazard zones for Hawaii's Big Island

Pictured: A map showing lava flow hazard zones for Hawaii’s Big Island

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